Interculturalism: understanding the concept from a comparative perspective

The research analyses the prescriptive use of the term ‘interculturalism’ in the legal sciences, with the dual purpose of understanding: 1) how its content is indebted to theoretical elaborations from other sciences; 2) in a comparative perspective, whether interculturalism has a uniform application in the different legal systems in which…

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From the Ottoman Millet to Neo-milletism: Israel and Lebanon in Comparison

The proposed article introduces the main features of the millet system of personal laws, which is considered the most emblematic and oldest example of personal federalism adopted by the Ottoman Empire and maintained, in different forms, in some contemporary States. The first part of the contribution outlines the origin of…

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Intercultural Health

This contribution investigates the meaning of ‘intercultural health’ through an analysis of the contexts in which this definition emerges. In particular, three areas are analyzed: that of indigenous communities, that of migrants and refugees and the more general context of therapeutic choices determined by cultural values. A final part of…

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The Multicultural State: Hypothesis for Framing a Concept

The contribution focuses on framings of the concept of the multicultural state. Only in recent times have certain questions prompted a re-thinking of previous definitions of the dogmatic category of state. The difficulty of tracing practical aspects back to theoretical models has led to seeing the multicultural state as an…

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Intercultural Education: What Is Called for? A Comparison of European and Latin-America Experiences

Intercultural education policy has emerged as an alternative to both assimilationism and multiculturalism. While multiculturalism emphasizes the cultural identity of social groups, somehow crystallizing their characteristics, interculturalism is based on a different understanding: it favors mutual dialogue and it assumes that the cultural identity of an individual cannot be equated…

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Towards a Different Understanding of Legal Traditions. Comparative Law Insights

In the legal field, the definition of the term ‘tradition’ suffers from heterogeneous understandings. These epistemological difficulties hint at one of the determinants of the definition of ‘legal tradition’, namely, an appeal to predominantly endogenous cultural aspects and not purely legal forms of legitimacy in the narrow sense. ‘Tradition’ and…

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Multiculturalism

Within the interdisciplinary project “Interculturalism: A Comparative Lexicon”, this article aims to analyse the concept of multiculturalism from an anthropological perspective. To do so, the article first focuses on the ways in which multicultural policies have been implemented in different Latin American countries, particularly with regard to indigenous peoples. It…

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Intangible Heritage Law and Epistemic (In)justice: The participation of communities, groups, and individuals in safeguarding ICH

Taking into consideration the enactment of the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2003, and the provision for the participation of communities, groups and individuals, this article aims to critically analyse the interactions between the right to intangible cultural heritage safeguard with the theory of justice, especially…

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Interculturalism, a comparative lexicon. Editorial introduction.

This special issue, “Interculturalism: A Comparative Lexicon”, has emerged from an interdisciplinary collaboration of researchers involved in the Prin 2017 project, “From Legal Pluralism to the Intercultural State. Personal Law, Exceptions to General Rules and Imperative Limits in the European Legal Space”. The project further evolved at the 23rd International…

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Two wrongs don’t make one right – Memory, History and Rebalancing Actions: A Reading on ‘Cancel Culture’ through the Lens of a Restorative Approach

The following contribution focuses on how to match the lens of restorative justice with the concerns of (also structural) past imbalance, today commonly considered as forms of injustice which need to be rebalanced through a variety of measures. Nowadays these situations are considered part of history (e.g., colonialism, various forms…

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